Lincolns Inn Fields, July 21. 1683

This is an Account of the Execution of William, Lord Russell, leader of the opposition to the Duke of York

Lincolns Inn Fields, July 21. ’83

Following on from July 20th…

So, with four bells ringing out from the tower, we duly called on him, yet he was so deep asleep, that I had to gently shake-him. As he awoke, he asked me ‘what o’clock it was, I’m I late?’ but as I was preparing his things for him to dress, he fell asleep again. Now, Dr. Burnet came into the room, and woke him once again, saying, ‘What, my lord, asleep?’

‘Yes, Doctor,’ he said, ‘I have slept heartily since one o’clock’. Then he desired him to go to his wife, to say that he was well, and had slept well, and hoped she had done so. Before the Doctor left, they both prayed together for some time, before his Lordship retired into his private chamber, to prayed by himself.

Whilst the Doctor conducted himself to Lady Russell, his Lordship dressed himself as normal, with neither more nor less care as on any other day, save only he did not lose time being shaved. His Lordship was in the mildest of good temper as he always was and thanked God, for he felt no sort of fear nor hurry in his thoughts. Then the Dean of Canterbury came to the rooms and spoke with his Lordship. As the Dean withdrew, we both looked at one another, amazed at the mild and fine temper of his Lordship. Now he handed me several letters for his relations, for he had been up some hours of the writing.  For he was in earnest than no one seek revenge for what had been done to him. Then he took up his watch, to wind it up, but the ring through which the ribband passes, broke in his hand, which he thought a little strange. Then his Lordship placed it into my hands and said, ‘I have done with time now eternity comes, I shall give you my time on the scaffold, but now it must be time for some fine tea’.

I now prepared his choice of tea, and his Lordship merrily drank two dishes in silence. Finally, about half an hour before he was to be called upon by the sheriffs, I passed him a hearty glass of sherry which he enjoyed, and then he ate a mouthful of bread. We then had notice from Captain Richardson that the sheriffs were here. With this, his Lordship withdrew once more into his private chamber, but only for a moment, returning with no alteration in his looks. As he came down, my Lord Cavendish was waiting, and his Lordship then spoke to him in great earnestness. With this act complete, we went out to his coach with all his ordinary cheerfulness.

It was a surprise to see so great a crowd outside Newgate, even though the rain was still in the air. And as we passed through this crowd, his Lordship looked about him still, and knew several persons. Some he saw staring on him, who knew him, and did not put off their hats. Quietly said to me ‘there is great joy in some but that did not touch him so much as the tears he observed in other people’s eyes. For that”, he said, “makes me tender.”

As the coach rumbled and bumped across the poor roads of London, I observed that his Lordship was often singing to himself, but I could not hear the words, so I asked him what he sang. His Lordship said “tis the beginning of the 119th psalm but I shall sing all the louder very soon.” Then seeing the large numbers on the street watching us pass, he said, ‘soon I shall see a greater and better company than this’. Then as we turned into Little Queen Street, he said, ‘I have often turned to the other hand with great comfort, but now I turn to this hand with greater’, but then he looked towards his own house and I saw a tear or two in his eye.

When we came into Lincoln’s Inn Field, he wondered to see such a large crowd and muttered as if to himself, “this has been to me a place of sinning and God now makes it the place of my punishment.” Then as it had rained a little while we were on the way, he said to us within Coach, “this rain may do you hurt that are bare-headed, if the rain should continue, for a show in a rainy day was a very dull thing.” Which made us all smile, then after all was quiet, he stepped out from the Coach and was escorted to the scaffold by the sheriffs. Now my Lordship took forth his letter and spoke to the sheriffs and the crowd; “Gentlemen, I expected the noise would be such, that I should not be very well heard. I was never fond of much speaking, much less now. Therefore I have set down in this paper all that I think fit to leave behind me. God knows how far I was always from designs against the King’s person, or of altering the government. And I still pray for the preservation of both, and of the Protestant religion.”

Then he turned to the Sheriff and asked; “Mr. Sheriff, I am told, that Captain Walcott yesterday said some things concerning my knowledge of the plot. I know not whether the report is true or not?”

Mr. Sheriff replied, “I did not hear him name your lordship.”

Then someone in the crowd called out, “NO, my lord, your lordship was not named by any of them.”

To this Lordship retorted, “I hope that is true. For, to my knowledge, I never saw him, nor spoke with him, in my whole life.” Now, returning to his paper, and continued, “in the words of a dying man, I profess I know of no plot, either against the King’s life or the government. But I have now done with this world and am going to a better place. I forgive all the world heartily, and I thank God I die in charity with all men. I wish all sincere Protestants may love one another, and not make way for Popery by their animosities. I pray God forgive them, and continue the Protestant religion amongst them, that it may flourish so long as the sun and moon endure. I am now more satisfied to die than ever I have been.”

Then turn to the Dean, he said “lets us pray together this last time” and so they knelt for a few moment, and then no rising, he spoke a quiet word to the Dean, and gave him his ring.

Then turning to me simply said “Thank you for friendship” and pressed his watch into my hand he finish, “when we are done here, remember me to those at Southampton House and Bedford House, and deliver the letters that have given into you charge.” Then he knelt down and prayed about three or four minutes by himself.

His Lordship, now threw off his periwig, which got a cold cheer from the crowd, then taking out a night-cap he had in his pocket, he turned to Mr Taunton his servant said, “Taunton you have been a faithful servant to me and I hope, if my son lives, that all shall equally serve him as long as all have me.” and then put on his night-cap, unbuttoned his coat, and let it be drawn off by Taunton. After that, he took off his cravat. All without the least single of fear or any change of countenance.

And with the same courage, after his Lordship turned to Mr  Ketch the executioner, and handed him a small purse from his waistcoat saying, “once I’m laid down, I will give no sign, so please take me swiftly to my God.”

Then he laid down, but then someone from the crowd shouted “make a lane, that the Duke of Albemarle might see” upon which his Lordship looked full that way.

But when he had lain down, I looked once at him, and saw no change in his looks, and though he was still lifting his hands, there was no trembling, then in that moment in which I looked, the executioners axe stuck. Yet, his Lordship head did not fall, but at the second stroke, Mr Ketch cut his head clean off. I now set off to delivery his letters, including this one to the King.

This all I can remember between his Lordship, William Russell and me on this rainy 21st July ’83.

William Savage

Newgate Gaol, July 19. 1683

This is a copy of the Letter, written by William, Lord Russell to his Majesty, King Charles II

Newgate, July 19. ’83

May it please Your Majesty,

Since this is not to be delivered till after my death, I hope Your Majesty will forgive the presumption of an attainted man’s writing to you. My chief business is to humbly ask your pardon, for any thing that I have either said, or done, that might look like want of respect to your Majesty, or duty to your government. In which, though I do to the last moment acquit myself of all designs against your person, or of altering of the government, and protest I know of no design, now on foot, against either. Yet I do not deny but I have heard many things, and said some things contrary to my duty, for which, as I have asked God’s pardon, so I humbly beg Your Majesty’s. And I take the liberty to add, that though I have met with hard measure, yet I forgive all concerned in it, from the highest to the lowest; and I pray God to bless both your person and government, and that the public peace, and the true Protestant religion, may be preserved under you. And I crave leave to end my days with this sincere protestation, that my heart was ever devoted to that which I thought was your true interest; in which, if I was mistaken, I hope your displeasure against me will end with my life, and that no part of it shall fall on my wife and children; which is the last petition will ever be offered you from, May it please Your Majesty.

Your Majesty’s most faithful, most dutiful, and most obedient subject,

Newgate Gaol, July 20. 1683

This is the Account of the last night of William, Lord Russell, leader of the Whig party, the only opposition to the Duke of York’s faction

Newgate Gaol, July 20. 1683

I shall not go into all the detail of the Rye House plot in this Account, other than to say that it was the fantasy of three men by the names of Josiah Keeling, John Rumsey and Robert West. For they had hatched a ‘plan’ to kill the King and the Duke of York, and together with Dr Ferguson they then schemed, plotted and wove a web around the members of the Green Ribbon Club. Then they cajoled and falsified the words of each, to entangle, trap the rest, whilst making their plot bigger and bolder. Finally, once the fine silk threads of their plot had touched every member of the opposition, including my Lord William Russell and my Grace, the Duke of Monmouth. Now they pulled the silk thread and sprang their trap.  For they are in the pay of the spider James, Duke of York and now with no crime having been committed; no attempt on any life having been made, they turned King evidence. Within days, all the leading members Kings opposition found themselves in Newgate. Some, like the slippery William, Lord Howard and weak Ford, Lord Grey also turn Kings evidence, adding their weight to the ‘plot’. Alas, over the next month, all those that opposed the Duke of York, either flee to the United Provinces or lose their heads. Until, this evening, only one man remains in this prison, his Lordship and my friend, William, Lord Russell.

His trial for high treason, was through association. It was purely based on the hearsay word of two witnesses, the duo Rumsey and West, both of whom reference the other as the hearsay provider. Even the conspirator, Lord Howard, did not sink so low as to add anything against his Lordship. Yet, this remarkable lack of substance was enough for the King’s most trusted creature Judge Jeffreys, to declare his Lordship, “Guilty! And you shall be executed, by beheading on a scaffold, to be erected near your home, in Lincoln’s Inn Fields, this 21st July ‘83”.

Now this evening I wait on my lordship and Lady Russell, for Newgate is a damp and sad place without friends. Towards supper time, my Lady makes to rise and leave but my Lordship speaks out “no, Rachel, please stay and sup with me, let us eat our last earthly food together.”

With this I prepared the extra place at his table and fetch a chair for her Ladyship and fetch the meal. Sitting close together they ate and talked very cheerfully on various subjects, particularly of their two daughters and son. I heard him mention several passages of dying men with great freedom of spirit. Then during this last supper, he bled at the nose, which he was wont to do, on which he said to us both, with a smile, “I shall not now let blood, for I shall do that tomorrow,” with which he drew out a handkerchief and stopped the flow. Yet, I could see a sparkle of a tear in her Ladyship eye.

Finally, with the supper over, they took some final time together, whilst I looked for her Ladyship’s coach. On my return, on hearing the rain pounding hard outside his Lordship declared, “Such a rain tomorrow will spoil a great show, which is a dull thing on a rainy day.”  

With this he took his wife by the hand, and said softly to her, “Rachel, my love, this flesh you now feel, in a few hours, must be cold, but my love will stay forever warm. Yet, I fear that it’s now ten o’clock and you should leave this damp and dark place and sleep well in your bed, as I will in mine, we must now be parted on the earth.”

Then they kissed four or five times and I could see that she governed her sorrow. For she knew that the sight of her distress, would add greater pain to this final separation. Thus, they parted not with sobs nor tears, but with a composed silence and for they both understood any more would destroy the other, for she wishing to spare the feelings of the husband, and the husband of the wife, they both restrained their great sadness.

When she was gone, he said, “Now the bitterness of death is past, I can be resolved for the future.”

Then his Lordship, turned to me, with a tear in his eye, and spoke tenderly, “I shall regret only one thing on leaving this earth, and that is being parted from my dearest Rachel, yet it was such great a blessing that she had such magnanimity of spirit, for it would have been a misery for me, if she had not.”

Then he sat at his table, with pen, ink and a supply of paper and started to write his final words and letters.At about twelve my Lordship, on hearing the still heavy rain outside, turned to me once more and said, ‘I do hope that this poor weather does not spoil our show tomorrow, for it is time now for me to retire to my chamber, to undress and sleep but before you get Captain Robertson to lock me in, please wake me tomorrow at four.’

“Yes, my Lord, and do not worry on this rain, for you have done far greater things, in far worst weather than this, I bid you a good night”, and with this I left to fetch the Captain. I then sat down in that sad dark place, listening to the sounds of the night, that you only hear in such a place as this. So, in sober contemplation, I now awaited the fourth bell.

In my next, I shall give an Account of the execution of this friend and noble man.

William Savage

Dorchester, July 18. 1685

On reaching Ilfracombe we run into a company of Militia, but after an exchange of shot and they quickly withdraw, giving us time to flee into the hills. Alas, this is covered in Militia parties and we are forced to hide during the day, so now we must travel at night. Our plan is to make our way to a place called Brendan, for it is here that John Gilton, one of the men from Minehead, has a ‘brother’ who can provide a safe place for us to hide. Then more misfortune strikes, for during the early hours of the second night, we are discovered by out-guards of Militia Horse. In the short firefight that follows we chased them off, but Col. Wade is hit in the back by a pistol shot. By the time we reach the brothers house, Col. Wade is unconscious so we lay him in the bed, for he is close the death. It is here we now agree that our only chance, is to spilt into smaller parties to make good our escapes. Young William Hewling does elect to stay with Col. Wade until the end. So, it is now with a heavy hearts that we say our farewells and each party leaves to find their own fate.

Richard Goodenough and I agree to head back toward the coast, rather than towards Crediton, for there are plenty of fisherman huts and cabins within which we can to hide. We find cover under an old boat and over the next day we spy many enemy patrols but none saw us. However, as we slept, a fisherman’s lad came upon us and raised the alarm. So, before we knew much of it, a strong Militia party had come for us and being so outnumbered, we put ourselves into their mercy. We are now taken as prisoners to Exeter for they can see we are officers. One man recognises Richard as a leading Rebel, so he is now set to go to Newgate, whilst I shall be taken to Dorchester the next morning. It is on this night that I learn the sad news of his Majesties death, and openly weep for I have now broken the promise I made to his mother those many years ago.

When I arrive in Dorchester Gaol, it is already full of other fugitives, some I know with a nod, others I do not and can’t trust, for I have given a false name. All the prisoners tell of how after the Battle they saw trees full of the dead. How the enemy treated every commoner, man or women, as ‘Guilty’, even if they could prove otherwise. How the penalty for being ‘out without just cause’ was to hang from the gibbet or be shot. This type of cruel justice has not been seen in England since the reign, of that most bloody of monarchs, Queen Mary. But this was how the Catholic Duke treated the Scotch before he took the crown and now it is our Kingdoms fate.  But it is only in Ireland, during the last war, that I saw such cruel and harsh treatment of the soldiers and common people alike, for today we have word that every man in Taunton is be made a martyr for the cause.

More poor souls are forced to join us and there must be near to 200 in this dark and damp place. The newcomers have been arrested for simply being ‘absent from their homes without due reason’ or ‘out and about’  or ‘aiding’ (or just those the sheriff’s or neighbours dislike). Even those that left us before the Philips Norton fight and can produce the ‘general pardon’, do find themselves with us once again. As we make space for each new prisoner, he pays by giving us fresh news and reports of our friends and of our enemies. This is how I learn that the blood-letting has only just started. For now, as if to emphases the righteousness of our cause, this Catholic King, has become the Tyrant King we knew him to be.  For our Judge is be the cruellest of the Tyrants creatures. One with his hands so covered in the blood of Whigs that his very skin is stained red. For I know this man, and I know that he will be a killing Judge, for his name is Jeffreys. With this sad knowledge, I know the type of justice we shall receive. For those that plea ‘Not Guilty’ shall die hard, those that plea ‘Guilty’ shall die easy, but those that beg for ‘mercy’ shall die the worst.

This morning and every morning we  awake knowing each new day, is one closer to us joining his Majesty. So, with hunger eating away at our bellies and dry tongues swelling in our mouths, we wait our lot in the Assizes. But although we know our destiny, as one man whispered to me, he summed up how most of us feel, for he said, ‘I seek no justice from this Tyrant, for I shall get none. I fought for my Liberty and so I shall die for my Liberty. I pray folk remember us, for we all shall die to secure their Liberty from a Tyrant.’  

So, this is a Tyrants justice, one where innocent and guilty men alike are hung and quartered without a word, where women shall be burnt alive for feeding their husbands. We have lost this Rebellion, so his justice will turn the West of England into a shambles, full of rotting limbs and human carcases, of widows, hunger and empty streets. The smell of death will be across these four counties for generations, for this will be a Bloody Assizes.

‘Yours in the cause!’

[Editors Note: It is hard to date these last entries of the Monmouth Rebellion journals, but we know Richard Goodenough is captured on the 14th July, so I have put them together in this place]

Texel, May 30. 1685
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Today we sailed in the Heldevenberg for England together with the Duke of Monmouth and 81 other gentlemen of honour

Today we sailed in the Heldevenberg for England together with the Duke of Monmouth and 81 other gentlemen of honour

Today we sailed in the Heldevenberg for England together with the Duke of Monmouth and 81 other gentlemen of honour

The Channel, June 9. 1685
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This evening the Duke of Monmouth issues his commissions and gives instruction on the forming of his Army

This evening the Duke of Monmouth issues his commissions and gives instruction on the forming of his Army

This evening the Duke of Monmouth issues his commissions and gives instruction on the forming of his Army

Seatown, June 10. 1685
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This evening a small party is landed at Seatown to send word of Monmouth's landing at Lyme tomorrow.

This evening a small party is landed at Seatown to send word of Monmouth's landing at Lyme tomorrow.

This evening a small party is landed at Seatown to send word of Monmouth's landing at Lyme tomorrow.

Lyme, June 11. 1685
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Monmouth and his supporters land at Lyme to cheering crowds.

Monmouth and his supporters land at Lyme to cheering crowds.

Monmouth and his supporters land at Lyme to cheering crowds.

Lyme, June 12. 1685
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Monmouth's Army now numbers over 1500 men, yet news arrives that Royal Militia is close at hand.

Monmouth's Army now numbers over 1500 men, yet news arrives that Royal Militia is close at hand.

Monmouth's Army now numbers over 1500 men, yet news arrives that Royal Militia is close at hand.

Lyme, June 13. 1685
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Today we drew first blood after a skirmish with the Militia Horse, leaving two of them dead on the field.

Today we drew first blood after a skirmish with the Militia Horse, leaving two of them dead on the field.

Today we drew first blood after a skirmish with the Militia Horse, leaving two of them dead on the field.

Bridport, June 14. 1685
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Today we fought our first battle with the Militia at Bridport. Our Foot accounted themselves very well.

Today we fought our first battle with the Militia at Bridport. Our Foot accounted themselves very well.

Today we fought our first battle with the Militia at Bridport. Our Foot accounted themselves very well.

Axminster, June 15. 1685
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This day we marched to Axminster and put the Militia to flight.

This day we marched to Axminster and put the Militia to flight.

This day we marched to Axminster and put the Militia to flight.

Chard, June 16. 1685
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Today Monmouth's Army reaches Chard, whilst it continues to grow, now over 3000 men have joined his Grace.

Today Monmouth's Army reaches Chard, whilst it continues to grow, now over 3000 men have joined his Grace.

Today Monmouth's Army reaches Chard, whilst it continues to grow, now over 3000 men have joined his Grace.

Ilminster, June 17. 1685
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The Duke of Monmouth and his Army reaches Ilminster

The Duke of Monmouth and his Army reaches Ilminster

The Duke of Monmouth and his Army reaches Ilminster

Taunton, June 18. 1685
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Monmouth and his Army reach Taunton this evening.

Monmouth and his Army reach Taunton this evening.

Monmouth and his Army reach Taunton this evening.

Taunton, June 19. 1685
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Today we entered Taunton and a new Foot Regiment, the Blue, is raised from Taunton-men.

Today we entered Taunton and a new Foot Regiment, the Blue, is raised from Taunton-men.

Today we entered Taunton and a new Foot Regiment, the Blue, is raised from Taunton-men.

Taunton, June 20. 1685
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The Duke of Monmouth is proclaimed King at the market cross.

The Duke of Monmouth is proclaimed King at the market cross.

The Duke of Monmouth is proclaimed King at the market cross.

Bridgwater, June 21. 1685
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We can now field an Army of 5 Horse Squadrons, 5 Foot Battalions & 4 field cannon.

We can now field an Army of 5 Horse Squadrons, 5 Foot Battalions & 4 field cannon.

We can now field an Army of 5 Horse Squadrons, 5 Foot Battalions & 4 field cannon.

Glastonbury, June 22. 1685
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There is a skirmish between our Horse and those of the enemy at Langport whilst the clubmen look to join with us.

There is a skirmish between our Horse and those of the enemy at Langport whilst the clubmen look to join with us.

There is a skirmish between our Horse and those of the enemy at Langport whilst the clubmen look to join with us.

Shepton Mallet, June 23. 1685
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This day we have progressed to Shepton Mallet but the heavy rain is slowing our advance.

This day we have progressed to Shepton Mallet but the heavy rain is slowing our advance.

This day we have progressed to Shepton Mallet but the heavy rain is slowing our advance.

Pensford, June 24. 1685
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This day we reach Pensford but have word the enemy has damaged the Keynsham Bridge

This day we reach Pensford but have word the enemy has damaged the Keynsham Bridge

This day we reach Pensford but have word the enemy has damaged the Keynsham Bridge

Keynsham, June 25. 1685
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This day we crossed the Avon by the repaired Bridge at Keynsham and fought of the enemy Horse

This day we crossed the Avon by the repaired Bridge at Keynsham and fought of the enemy Horse

This day we crossed the Avon by the repaired Bridge at Keynsham and fought of the enemy Horse

Philips Norton, June 26. 1685
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Monmouth and his Army reach Philips Norton after a long march in heavy rain.

Monmouth and his Army reach Philips Norton after a long march in heavy rain.

Monmouth and his Army reach Philips Norton after a long march in heavy rain.

Philips Norton, June 27. 1685
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Today there is a Battle between Monmouth's Army and the enemy at Philips Norton.

Today there is a Battle between Monmouth's Army and the enemy at Philips Norton.

Today there is a Battle between Monmouth's Army and the enemy at Philips Norton.

Frome, June 28. 1685
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This day Monmouth and his arrive exhausted at Frome after a night march in the rain

This day Monmouth and his arrive exhausted at Frome after a night march in the rain

This day Monmouth and his arrive exhausted at Frome after a night march in the rain

Frome, June 29. 1685
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The council of War debate the General Pardon issued by the enemy and elect to fight on.

The council of War debate the General Pardon issued by the enemy and elect to fight on.

The council of War debate the General Pardon issued by the enemy and elect to fight on.

Shepton Mallet, June 30. 1685
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Monmouth and his Army finding the path to London closed retires West to Shepton Mallet.

Monmouth and his Army finding the path to London closed retires West to Shepton Mallet.

Monmouth and his Army finding the path to London closed retires West to Shepton Mallet.

Wells, July 1. 1685
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This day we captured enemy baggage as Wells and rest here for the night.

This day we captured enemy baggage as Wells and rest here for the night.

This day we captured enemy baggage as Wells and rest here for the night.

Sedgemoor, July 2. 1685
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This day as we marched to Pedwell to meet the grand Clubmen Army of Somerset, yet upon our arrival, they only number some 200 men.

This day as we marched to Pedwell to meet the grand Clubmen Army of Somerset, yet upon our arrival, they only number some 200 men.

This day as we marched to Pedwell to meet the grand Clubmen Army of Somerset, yet upon our arrival, they only number some 200 men.

Bridgwater, July 3. 1683
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Monmouth and his Army return to Bridgwater and start to fortify the town

Monmouth and his Army return to Bridgwater and start to fortify the town

Monmouth and his Army return to Bridgwater and start to fortify the town

Bridgwater, July 4. 1685
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The Army remains at Bridgwater and this evening the local men are allowed to return to their homes as the enemy doesn't press us.

The Army remains at Bridgwater and this evening the local men are allowed to return to their homes as the enemy doesn't press us.

The Army remains at Bridgwater and this evening the local men are allowed to return to their homes as the enemy doesn't press us.

Bridgwater, July 5. 1685
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This afternoon we prepare to march overnight to Axbridge meanwhile the enemy has advanced to Westonzoyland

This afternoon we prepare to march overnight to Axbridge meanwhile the enemy has advanced to Westonzoyland

This afternoon we prepare to march overnight to Axbridge meanwhile the enemy has advanced to Westonzoyland

Castlefield, July 5. 1685
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By late afternoon it is clear our enemy camps at Weston but leaves their right flank in the air.

By late afternoon it is clear our enemy camps at Weston but leaves their right flank in the air.

By late afternoon it is clear our enemy camps at Weston but leaves their right flank in the air.

Longmoor, July 6. 1685
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This night we march to Longmoor to surprise the enemy but a troopers pistol goes off at half-cock.

This night we march to Longmoor to surprise the enemy but a troopers pistol goes off at half-cock.

This night we march to Longmoor to surprise the enemy but a troopers pistol goes off at half-cock.

Sedgemoor, July 6. 1685
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The Armies of the two King's fought a great Battle at Sedgemoor, the victor wrote the History. This is an account from one side.

The Armies of the two King's fought a great Battle at Sedgemoor, the victor wrote the History. This is an account from one side.

The Armies of the two King's fought a great Battle at Sedgemoor, the victor wrote the History. This is an account from one side.

Ilfracombe, July 7. 1685
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With the Rebellion lost, it is every man for himself, Wade, Goodenough, Ferguson and a party make their Escape from Ilfracombe.

With the Rebellion lost, it is every man for himself, Wade, Goodenough, Ferguson and a party make their Escape from Ilfracombe.

With the Rebellion lost, it is every man for himself, Wade, Goodenough, Ferguson and a party make their Escape from Ilfracombe.

Tower Hill, July 15. 1685
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This is an account of the bloody and botched execution of James, Duke of Monmouth on Tower Hill.

This is an account of the bloody and botched execution of James, Duke of Monmouth on Tower Hill.

This is an account of the bloody and botched execution of James, Duke of Monmouth on Tower Hill.

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Tower Hill, July 15. 1685

An Eyewitness Account of the Execution of his Majesty James, Duke of Monmouth on Tower Hill, July 15. 1685

St Martins in the Fields, October 1686

My dear Uncle,

In your last you asked for my account of what I witnessed on July 15, ’85. That day was so shocking that it remains fresh in my mind even today. So much so, that when remembering those saddening events on Tower Hill my heart fills with darkness and my eyes swell with tears. For that day, was the last that my brother James stood before the world, then taken from us.

My husband and I, had travelled early by the river to Tower Hill, which was exceedingly crowded, so that we found ourselves someway back from the scaffold erected for his killing.  James was brought hither from the Tower in the Governors coach to the scaffold at around 10 of the clock and was guarded all around by thick ranks Redcoats all armed with Pike and Musket.  The commoners were so keen to see his Majesty for the last time, that the coach passed slowly through the vast mass of people. Any that garnered bad feelings towards him or swore, found themselves quickly put down by those that supported his cause. Then his Majesty did with solemn grace and dignity remove himself from the coach, although he was clearly shaken, whilst walking toward the scaffold, he saluted the soldiers with a smile, then he mounted the steps with a firm tread.

Now his Majesty looked out towards me, for I’m sure he acknowledged me with a small nod of his head. I can’t be sure as if this was for my pleasure, as the crowd was so large with every point taken by apprentices and all other loyal Monmouth men. Therefore, if it were not for the great number of soldiers, we would have taken his Majesty into our arms and been away with him. Now the crowd fell into a sombre stillness and silence, which was only broken by the noise of our weeping, for he was still beloved by his people.

Then he spoke, a little faint but I believe these are his words, ‘I shall say little,’ he began. ‘I come here, not to speak, but to die. I die a Protestant of the Church of England.’ Upon which the crowd shifted and our weeping grow louder, now the Bishops interjected, and said some words to his Majesty, to which he then spoke of his love for his Lady Henrietta. But once again this bishop interrupted and spoke softly, which the crowd could not hear, but upon us becoming restless, his Majesty spoke out ‘I do own that. I am sorry that it ever happened.’ It was now that the great body called out; ‘No!’, or ‘One King!’, or ‘for Liberty!’. With which the soldiers and officials began to look for the culprits, but those around the scaffold closed ranks and pushed toward his Majesty.

Then his Majesty did kneel in prayer, and ‘Sir,’ said one of the Bishops, ‘do you not pray for the King with us?’.

Upon which his Majesty, paused for some time, and after an internal struggle, exclaimed ‘Amen!’.

Then they implored him to speak to the crowd and soldiers, with some word of obedience to the Catholic Duke, but none were spoken by his Majesty, who exclaimed ‘I will make no speeches’, and turning away, called his servant, and put into the man’s hand a toothpick case, the last token of ill-starred love. ‘Give it,’ he said, ‘to that person.’.

Next his Majesty turned to Mr Ketch, and said so all could hear, ‘Here are six guineas for you.’, then feeling the edge of the Axe, he continued, ‘Do not hack me as you did my Lord Russell. I have heard that you struck him three or four times. My servant will give you some more gold if you do the work well.’

With which Ketch said to the crowd, ‘my lord this Axe is sharp enough, and heavy enough.’

Then taking off his coat, his Majesty, lay down, placing his head upon the block. Then the Axe struck a hard blow, yet with a gasp from the crowd, his Majesty arose a little and looked scornfully at Mr Ketch, before putting his neck once more on the block. The axe then fell, again, and again. Still his Majesties body still lived. Now great yells of rage and horror rose from us, and then the wretched Ketch flung down his axe with a curse exclaiming ‘I cannot do it, for my heart fails me.’

Now the sheriff called out, ‘Take up the axe, man!’

All the time the angry mob called out, ‘Fling him over the rails, we will save him’

Shamefully, his Majesty, was still live upon that scaffold, for his body still twitched and his Royal blood was flowing out onto the boards. Finally, Ketch picked up the Axe once more, then twice, then thrice it came down. Still his Majesties head remain at one with his body. So, the crowd turned viciously on the soldiers and pushed closer toward the body. With the blood flowing from his martyred body, the despicable Ketch, was finally given a knife by the sheriff. It was with this, that he finally cut the head free from its immortal being. The mob now called out ‘One King, King Monmouth, kill his butcher!’ and the crowd surged towards his Majesties corpse. Now the soldiers had to push their way through the angry crowd, and all-a-while the common men pushed, punched, or spat at the Ketch, so that he never received his bounty. At the end, I had the honour to dip my neckerchief into my brothers blood, as he is a martyr to our lost Liberties and the Protestant Religion, more so than our grandfather. Finally, his Majesties body and severed head were lain together in a coffin covered with black velvet and then buried under the communion table of St. Peter’s Chapel in the Tower.

This is how my brother was handed into the embrace of the Lord of Hosts. This my true account of that bloody day in London.

Your loving niece for the cause of liberty and justice,

Mrs Fanshawe

Texel, May 30. 1685
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Today we sailed in the Heldevenberg for England together with the Duke of Monmouth and 81 other gentlemen of honour

Today we sailed in the Heldevenberg for England together with the Duke of Monmouth and 81 other gentlemen of honour

Today we sailed in the Heldevenberg for England together with the Duke of Monmouth and 81 other gentlemen of honour

The Channel, June 9. 1685
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This evening the Duke of Monmouth issues his commissions and gives instruction on the forming of his Army

This evening the Duke of Monmouth issues his commissions and gives instruction on the forming of his Army

This evening the Duke of Monmouth issues his commissions and gives instruction on the forming of his Army

Seatown, June 10. 1685
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This evening a small party is landed at Seatown to send word of Monmouth's landing at Lyme tomorrow.

This evening a small party is landed at Seatown to send word of Monmouth's landing at Lyme tomorrow.

This evening a small party is landed at Seatown to send word of Monmouth's landing at Lyme tomorrow.

Lyme, June 11. 1685
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Monmouth and his supporters land at Lyme to cheering crowds.

Monmouth and his supporters land at Lyme to cheering crowds.

Monmouth and his supporters land at Lyme to cheering crowds.

Lyme, June 12. 1685
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Monmouth's Army now numbers over 1500 men, yet news arrives that Royal Militia is close at hand.

Monmouth's Army now numbers over 1500 men, yet news arrives that Royal Militia is close at hand.

Monmouth's Army now numbers over 1500 men, yet news arrives that Royal Militia is close at hand.

Lyme, June 13. 1685
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Today we drew first blood after a skirmish with the Militia Horse, leaving two of them dead on the field.

Today we drew first blood after a skirmish with the Militia Horse, leaving two of them dead on the field.

Today we drew first blood after a skirmish with the Militia Horse, leaving two of them dead on the field.

Bridport, June 14. 1685
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Today we fought our first battle with the Militia at Bridport. Our Foot accounted themselves very well.

Today we fought our first battle with the Militia at Bridport. Our Foot accounted themselves very well.

Today we fought our first battle with the Militia at Bridport. Our Foot accounted themselves very well.

Axminster, June 15. 1685
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This day we marched to Axminster and put the Militia to flight.

This day we marched to Axminster and put the Militia to flight.

This day we marched to Axminster and put the Militia to flight.

Chard, June 16. 1685
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Today Monmouth's Army reaches Chard, whilst it continues to grow, now over 3000 men have joined his Grace.

Today Monmouth's Army reaches Chard, whilst it continues to grow, now over 3000 men have joined his Grace.

Today Monmouth's Army reaches Chard, whilst it continues to grow, now over 3000 men have joined his Grace.

Ilminster, June 17. 1685
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The Duke of Monmouth and his Army reaches Ilminster

The Duke of Monmouth and his Army reaches Ilminster

The Duke of Monmouth and his Army reaches Ilminster

Taunton, June 18. 1685
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Monmouth and his Army reach Taunton this evening.

Monmouth and his Army reach Taunton this evening.

Monmouth and his Army reach Taunton this evening.

Taunton, June 19. 1685
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Today we entered Taunton and a new Foot Regiment, the Blue, is raised from Taunton-men.

Today we entered Taunton and a new Foot Regiment, the Blue, is raised from Taunton-men.

Today we entered Taunton and a new Foot Regiment, the Blue, is raised from Taunton-men.

Taunton, June 20. 1685
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The Duke of Monmouth is proclaimed King at the market cross.

The Duke of Monmouth is proclaimed King at the market cross.

The Duke of Monmouth is proclaimed King at the market cross.

Bridgwater, June 21. 1685
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We can now field an Army of 5 Horse Squadrons, 5 Foot Battalions & 4 field cannon.

We can now field an Army of 5 Horse Squadrons, 5 Foot Battalions & 4 field cannon.

We can now field an Army of 5 Horse Squadrons, 5 Foot Battalions & 4 field cannon.

Glastonbury, June 22. 1685
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There is a skirmish between our Horse and those of the enemy at Langport whilst the clubmen look to join with us.

There is a skirmish between our Horse and those of the enemy at Langport whilst the clubmen look to join with us.

There is a skirmish between our Horse and those of the enemy at Langport whilst the clubmen look to join with us.

Shepton Mallet, June 23. 1685
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This day we have progressed to Shepton Mallet but the heavy rain is slowing our advance.

This day we have progressed to Shepton Mallet but the heavy rain is slowing our advance.

This day we have progressed to Shepton Mallet but the heavy rain is slowing our advance.

Pensford, June 24. 1685
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This day we reach Pensford but have word the enemy has damaged the Keynsham Bridge

This day we reach Pensford but have word the enemy has damaged the Keynsham Bridge

This day we reach Pensford but have word the enemy has damaged the Keynsham Bridge

Keynsham, June 25. 1685
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This day we crossed the Avon by the repaired Bridge at Keynsham and fought of the enemy Horse

This day we crossed the Avon by the repaired Bridge at Keynsham and fought of the enemy Horse

This day we crossed the Avon by the repaired Bridge at Keynsham and fought of the enemy Horse

Philips Norton, June 26. 1685
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Monmouth and his Army reach Philips Norton after a long march in heavy rain.

Monmouth and his Army reach Philips Norton after a long march in heavy rain.

Monmouth and his Army reach Philips Norton after a long march in heavy rain.

Philips Norton, June 27. 1685
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Today there is a Battle between Monmouth's Army and the enemy at Philips Norton.

Today there is a Battle between Monmouth's Army and the enemy at Philips Norton.

Today there is a Battle between Monmouth's Army and the enemy at Philips Norton.

Frome, June 28. 1685
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This day Monmouth and his arrive exhausted at Frome after a night march in the rain

This day Monmouth and his arrive exhausted at Frome after a night march in the rain

This day Monmouth and his arrive exhausted at Frome after a night march in the rain

Frome, June 29. 1685
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The council of War debate the General Pardon issued by the enemy and elect to fight on.

The council of War debate the General Pardon issued by the enemy and elect to fight on.

The council of War debate the General Pardon issued by the enemy and elect to fight on.

Shepton Mallet, June 30. 1685
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Monmouth and his Army finding the path to London closed retires West to Shepton Mallet.

Monmouth and his Army finding the path to London closed retires West to Shepton Mallet.

Monmouth and his Army finding the path to London closed retires West to Shepton Mallet.

Wells, July 1. 1685
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This day we captured enemy baggage as Wells and rest here for the night.

This day we captured enemy baggage as Wells and rest here for the night.

This day we captured enemy baggage as Wells and rest here for the night.

Sedgemoor, July 2. 1685
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This day as we marched to Pedwell to meet the grand Clubmen Army of Somerset, yet upon our arrival, they only number some 200 men.

This day as we marched to Pedwell to meet the grand Clubmen Army of Somerset, yet upon our arrival, they only number some 200 men.

This day as we marched to Pedwell to meet the grand Clubmen Army of Somerset, yet upon our arrival, they only number some 200 men.

Bridgwater, July 3. 1683
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Monmouth and his Army return to Bridgwater and start to fortify the town

Monmouth and his Army return to Bridgwater and start to fortify the town

Monmouth and his Army return to Bridgwater and start to fortify the town

Bridgwater, July 4. 1685
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The Army remains at Bridgwater and this evening the local men are allowed to return to their homes as the enemy doesn't press us.

The Army remains at Bridgwater and this evening the local men are allowed to return to their homes as the enemy doesn't press us.

The Army remains at Bridgwater and this evening the local men are allowed to return to their homes as the enemy doesn't press us.

Bridgwater, July 5. 1685
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This afternoon we prepare to march overnight to Axbridge meanwhile the enemy has advanced to Westonzoyland

This afternoon we prepare to march overnight to Axbridge meanwhile the enemy has advanced to Westonzoyland

This afternoon we prepare to march overnight to Axbridge meanwhile the enemy has advanced to Westonzoyland

Castlefield, July 5. 1685
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By late afternoon it is clear our enemy camps at Weston but leaves their right flank in the air.

By late afternoon it is clear our enemy camps at Weston but leaves their right flank in the air.

By late afternoon it is clear our enemy camps at Weston but leaves their right flank in the air.

Longmoor, July 6. 1685
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This night we march to Longmoor to surprise the enemy but a troopers pistol goes off at half-cock.

This night we march to Longmoor to surprise the enemy but a troopers pistol goes off at half-cock.

This night we march to Longmoor to surprise the enemy but a troopers pistol goes off at half-cock.

Sedgemoor, July 6. 1685
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The Armies of the two King's fought a great Battle at Sedgemoor, the victor wrote the History. This is an account from one side.

The Armies of the two King's fought a great Battle at Sedgemoor, the victor wrote the History. This is an account from one side.

The Armies of the two King's fought a great Battle at Sedgemoor, the victor wrote the History. This is an account from one side.

Ilfracombe, July 7. 1685
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With the Rebellion lost, it is every man for himself, Wade, Goodenough, Ferguson and a party make their Escape from Ilfracombe.

With the Rebellion lost, it is every man for himself, Wade, Goodenough, Ferguson and a party make their Escape from Ilfracombe.

With the Rebellion lost, it is every man for himself, Wade, Goodenough, Ferguson and a party make their Escape from Ilfracombe.

Tower Hill, July 15. 1685
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This is an account of the bloody and botched execution of James, Duke of Monmouth on Tower Hill.

This is an account of the bloody and botched execution of James, Duke of Monmouth on Tower Hill.

This is an account of the bloody and botched execution of James, Duke of Monmouth on Tower Hill.

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Whitehall, July 15. 1685

This day the late Duke of Monmouth being attainted of High Treason by Act of Parliament, was Beheaded on a Scaffold for that purpose erected on Tower Hill.

Click here to read an Eyewitness Account of the Bloody Execution. 

Edinburgh, June 1. 1685
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News of the Earl of Argyle and his march from movements from Campbeltown with now over 2500 supporters.

News of the Earl of Argyle and his march from movements from Campbeltown with now over 2500 supporters.

News of the Earl of Argyle and his march from movements from Campbeltown with now over 2500 supporters.

Edinburgh, June 6. 1685
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An account of the skirmishes at Glendarroch and Greenock between the forces of King and the rebels.

An account of the skirmishes at Glendarroch and Greenock between the forces of King and the rebels.

An account of the skirmishes at Glendarroch and Greenock between the forces of King and the rebels.

Edinburgh, June 9. 1685
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Earl of Argyll withdraws to Loch Fyne, whilst Scotch troops leave Holland.

Earl of Argyll withdraws to Loch Fyne, whilst Scotch troops leave Holland.

Earl of Argyll withdraws to Loch Fyne, whilst Scotch troops leave Holland.

Edinburgh, June 11. 1685
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News of Argyll's move to engage with the Kings force reaches London

News of Argyll's move to engage with the Kings force reaches London

News of Argyll's move to engage with the Kings force reaches London

Whitehall, June 13. 1685
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The King gets the news, that Monmouth has landed at Lyme.

The King gets the news, that Monmouth has landed at Lyme.

The King gets the news, that Monmouth has landed at Lyme.

Westminster, June 16. 1685
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Today the Act of Attainder against James, Duke of Monmouth for High Treason gets royal assent.

Today the Act of Attainder against James, Duke of Monmouth for High Treason gets royal assent.

Today the Act of Attainder against James, Duke of Monmouth for High Treason gets royal assent.

Whitehall, June 17. 1685
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News reaches London of the Bridport fight, at which the Rebels are defeated.

News reaches London of the Bridport fight, at which the Rebels are defeated.

News reaches London of the Bridport fight, at which the Rebels are defeated.

Edinburgh, June 18. 1685
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New reaches London of the capture of the Rebel ships, yet the Scotch Rebels still move towards Glasgow

New reaches London of the capture of the Rebel ships, yet the Scotch Rebels still move towards Glasgow

New reaches London of the capture of the Rebel ships, yet the Scotch Rebels still move towards Glasgow

Edinburgh, June 19. 1685
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The Kings forces have forced the Rebels to cross the Clyde in some disorder and we expect word of Argyll's capture daily.

The Kings forces have forced the Rebels to cross the Clyde in some disorder and we expect word of Argyll's capture daily.

The Kings forces have forced the Rebels to cross the Clyde in some disorder and we expect word of Argyll's capture daily.

Edinburgh, June 21. 1685
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News of the capture of the Rebel Earl of Argyll reaches London

News of the capture of the Rebel Earl of Argyll reaches London

News of the capture of the Rebel Earl of Argyll reaches London

Whitehall, June 21. 1865
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News of the fight at Ashill reaches London together with the Rebel progress

News of the fight at Ashill reaches London together with the Rebel progress

News of the fight at Ashill reaches London together with the Rebel progress

London, June 22. 1685
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The gossip in the London is that the Somerset Militia have killed Earl of Albemarle and joined with the Rebels.

The gossip in the London is that the Somerset Militia have killed Earl of Albemarle and joined with the Rebels.

The gossip in the London is that the Somerset Militia have killed Earl of Albemarle and joined with the Rebels.

Whitehall, June 23. 1685
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The Rebels ship are taken at Lyme and there is an encounter at Longport

The Rebels ship are taken at Lyme and there is an encounter at Longport

The Rebels ship are taken at Lyme and there is an encounter at Longport

Edinburgh, June 24. 1685
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The Scotch Rebels continue to be made prisoner but many others where killed the day Rumbold and Ayloff where taken.

The Scotch Rebels continue to be made prisoner but many others where killed the day Rumbold and Ayloff where taken.

The Scotch Rebels continue to be made prisoner but many others where killed the day Rumbold and Ayloff where taken.

Southwark, June 25. 1685
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The printer William Disnie is found guilty of treason for publishing pro-Monmouth papers.

The printer William Disnie is found guilty of treason for publishing pro-Monmouth papers.

The printer William Disnie is found guilty of treason for publishing pro-Monmouth papers.

Bristol, June 25. 1685
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The Earl of Feversham learns of Monmouth strength and plans from a spy

The Earl of Feversham learns of Monmouth strength and plans from a spy

The Earl of Feversham learns of Monmouth strength and plans from a spy

Edinburgh, June 26. 1685
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The Rebel Rumbold is hung and quartered for high Treason on this day

The Rebel Rumbold is hung and quartered for high Treason on this day

The Rebel Rumbold is hung and quartered for high Treason on this day

Whitehall, June 27. 1685
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His majesty has been pleased to the reward be distributed amongst the five soldiers of the Earl of Aran’s Militia, who took Rumbold in Scotland.

His majesty has been pleased to the reward be distributed amongst the five soldiers of the Earl of Aran’s Militia, who took Rumbold in Scotland.

His majesty has been pleased to the reward be distributed amongst the five soldiers of the Earl of Aran’s Militia, who took Rumbold in Scotland.

Whitehall, June 28. 1685
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The news in London is that there has been a fight at Keynsham and Rebels gathering at Frome are dispersed.

The news in London is that there has been a fight at Keynsham and Rebels gathering at Frome are dispersed.

The news in London is that there has been a fight at Keynsham and Rebels gathering at Frome are dispersed.

Whitehall, June 29. 1685
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The News in London is about the Battle of Philips Norton between the King forces and those of the Rebels.

The News in London is about the Battle of Philips Norton between the King forces and those of the Rebels.

The News in London is about the Battle of Philips Norton between the King forces and those of the Rebels.

Whitehall, June 30. 1685
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Three Scotch Regiments arrive this morning at Gravesend, whilst three English Regiments also in the Service of the United Provinces are due to arrive soon.

Three Scotch Regiments arrive this morning at Gravesend, whilst three English Regiments also in the Service of the United Provinces are due to arrive soon.

Three Scotch Regiments arrive this morning at Gravesend, whilst three English Regiments also in the Service of the United Provinces are due to arrive soon.

Westminster, July 1. 1685
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It is now High Treason to assert that the Duke of Monmouth that in anyway legitimate

It is now High Treason to assert that the Duke of Monmouth that in anyway legitimate

It is now High Treason to assert that the Duke of Monmouth that in anyway legitimate

Edinburgh, July 1. 1685
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The News in London is that the Earl of Argyll was executed yesterday and that Sir John Cochran is now captured.

The News in London is that the Earl of Argyll was executed yesterday and that Sir John Cochran is now captured.

The News in London is that the Earl of Argyll was executed yesterday and that Sir John Cochran is now captured.

Whitehall, July 1. 1685
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The News is that the Rebels retired to Shepton Mallet, whilst the Kings forces are now at Frome

The News is that the Rebels retired to Shepton Mallet, whilst the Kings forces are now at Frome

The News is that the Rebels retired to Shepton Mallet, whilst the Kings forces are now at Frome

Paris, July 2. 1685
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Louis XIV remarks that as the Duke of Monmouth has lost his vessels and has no city to retire to, he will soon meet with the same fate as the Earl of Argyll

Louis XIV remarks that as the Duke of Monmouth has lost his vessels and has no city to retire to, he will soon meet with the same fate as the Earl of Argyll

Louis XIV remarks that as the Duke of Monmouth has lost his vessels and has no city to retire to, he will soon meet with the same fate as the Earl of Argyll

Whitehall, July 4. 1685
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The Rebels sack and pillage Wells and are now in Bridgwater and 3 Scotch Regiments have marched from London.

The Rebels sack and pillage Wells and are now in Bridgwater and 3 Scotch Regiments have marched from London.

The Rebels sack and pillage Wells and are now in Bridgwater and 3 Scotch Regiments have marched from London.

Whitehall, July 8. 1685
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The News is that there has been a mighty Battle in a place called Sedgemoor and his Majesties forces are victorious.

The News is that there has been a mighty Battle in a place called Sedgemoor and his Majesties forces are victorious.

The News is that there has been a mighty Battle in a place called Sedgemoor and his Majesties forces are victorious.

Ringwod, July 8. 1685
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This very morning the King received an account that the Lord Grey was taken yesterday in at Ringwood being secured by my Lord Lumley.

This very morning the King received an account that the Lord Grey was taken yesterday in at Ringwood being secured by my Lord Lumley.

This very morning the King received an account that the Lord Grey was taken yesterday in at Ringwood being secured by my Lord Lumley.

London, July 8. 1685
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His Majesty has just now received an account that the Duke of Monmouth was taken in Dorestshire, and is in the hands of my Lord Lumley.

His Majesty has just now received an account that the Duke of Monmouth was taken in Dorestshire, and is in the hands of my Lord Lumley.

His Majesty has just now received an account that the Duke of Monmouth was taken in Dorestshire, and is in the hands of my Lord Lumley.

Whitehall, July 11. 1685
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As the Rebels are completely broken, dispersed or taken, the Kings forces go into quarters and Militia dismissed. The Duke of Monmouth and Lord Grey will be this night at Farnham

As the Rebels are completely broken, dispersed or taken, the Kings forces go into quarters and Militia dismissed. The Duke of Monmouth and Lord Grey will be this night at Farnham

As the Rebels are completely broken, dispersed or taken, the Kings forces go into quarters and Militia dismissed. The Duke of Monmouth and Lord Grey will be this night at Farnham

Whitehall, July 12. 1685
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The King proclaims that all subjects MUST attend services of solemn thanksgiving on the 26 July 1685 to celebrate His Victory over the Rebels.

The King proclaims that all subjects MUST attend services of solemn thanksgiving on the 26 July 1685 to celebrate His Victory over the Rebels.

The King proclaims that all subjects MUST attend services of solemn thanksgiving on the 26 July 1685 to celebrate His Victory over the Rebels.

Whitehall, July 13. 1685
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This evening the Duke of Monmouth and Lord Grey were carried to the Tower in Kings Barges, guarded by several other Barges with Soldiers.

This evening the Duke of Monmouth and Lord Grey were carried to the Tower in Kings Barges, guarded by several other Barges with Soldiers.

This evening the Duke of Monmouth and Lord Grey were carried to the Tower in Kings Barges, guarded by several other Barges with Soldiers.

Whitehall, July 15. 1685
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This day the late Duke of Monmouth being attainted of High Treason by Act of Parliament, was Beheaded on a Scaffold for that purpose erected on Tower Hill.

This day the late Duke of Monmouth being attainted of High Treason by Act of Parliament, was Beheaded on a Scaffold for that purpose erected on Tower Hill.

This day the late Duke of Monmouth being attainted of High Treason by Act of Parliament, was Beheaded on a Scaffold for that purpose erected on Tower Hill.

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Whitehall, July 13. 1685

This afternoon the Duke of Monmouth and Lord Grey, with the German, were brought hither by Water from Foxhall. At about eight in the evening they were carried to the Tower in the Kings Barges, guarded by several other Barges with Soldiers.

Edinburgh, June 1. 1685
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News of the Earl of Argyle and his march from movements from Campbeltown with now over 2500 supporters.

News of the Earl of Argyle and his march from movements from Campbeltown with now over 2500 supporters.

News of the Earl of Argyle and his march from movements from Campbeltown with now over 2500 supporters.

Edinburgh, June 6. 1685
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An account of the skirmishes at Glendarroch and Greenock between the forces of King and the rebels.

An account of the skirmishes at Glendarroch and Greenock between the forces of King and the rebels.

An account of the skirmishes at Glendarroch and Greenock between the forces of King and the rebels.

Edinburgh, June 9. 1685
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Earl of Argyll withdraws to Loch Fyne, whilst Scotch troops leave Holland.

Earl of Argyll withdraws to Loch Fyne, whilst Scotch troops leave Holland.

Earl of Argyll withdraws to Loch Fyne, whilst Scotch troops leave Holland.

Edinburgh, June 11. 1685
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News of Argyll's move to engage with the Kings force reaches London

News of Argyll's move to engage with the Kings force reaches London

News of Argyll's move to engage with the Kings force reaches London

Whitehall, June 13. 1685
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The King gets the news, that Monmouth has landed at Lyme.

The King gets the news, that Monmouth has landed at Lyme.

The King gets the news, that Monmouth has landed at Lyme.

Westminster, June 16. 1685
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Today the Act of Attainder against James, Duke of Monmouth for High Treason gets royal assent.

Today the Act of Attainder against James, Duke of Monmouth for High Treason gets royal assent.

Today the Act of Attainder against James, Duke of Monmouth for High Treason gets royal assent.

Whitehall, June 17. 1685
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News reaches London of the Bridport fight, at which the Rebels are defeated.

News reaches London of the Bridport fight, at which the Rebels are defeated.

News reaches London of the Bridport fight, at which the Rebels are defeated.

Edinburgh, June 18. 1685
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New reaches London of the capture of the Rebel ships, yet the Scotch Rebels still move towards Glasgow

New reaches London of the capture of the Rebel ships, yet the Scotch Rebels still move towards Glasgow

New reaches London of the capture of the Rebel ships, yet the Scotch Rebels still move towards Glasgow

Edinburgh, June 19. 1685
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The Kings forces have forced the Rebels to cross the Clyde in some disorder and we expect word of Argyll's capture daily.

The Kings forces have forced the Rebels to cross the Clyde in some disorder and we expect word of Argyll's capture daily.

The Kings forces have forced the Rebels to cross the Clyde in some disorder and we expect word of Argyll's capture daily.

Edinburgh, June 21. 1685
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News of the capture of the Rebel Earl of Argyll reaches London

News of the capture of the Rebel Earl of Argyll reaches London

News of the capture of the Rebel Earl of Argyll reaches London

Whitehall, June 21. 1865
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News of the fight at Ashill reaches London together with the Rebel progress

News of the fight at Ashill reaches London together with the Rebel progress

News of the fight at Ashill reaches London together with the Rebel progress

London, June 22. 1685
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The gossip in the London is that the Somerset Militia have killed Earl of Albemarle and joined with the Rebels.

The gossip in the London is that the Somerset Militia have killed Earl of Albemarle and joined with the Rebels.

The gossip in the London is that the Somerset Militia have killed Earl of Albemarle and joined with the Rebels.

Whitehall, June 23. 1685
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The Rebels ship are taken at Lyme and there is an encounter at Longport

The Rebels ship are taken at Lyme and there is an encounter at Longport

The Rebels ship are taken at Lyme and there is an encounter at Longport

Edinburgh, June 24. 1685
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The Scotch Rebels continue to be made prisoner but many others where killed the day Rumbold and Ayloff where taken.

The Scotch Rebels continue to be made prisoner but many others where killed the day Rumbold and Ayloff where taken.

The Scotch Rebels continue to be made prisoner but many others where killed the day Rumbold and Ayloff where taken.

Southwark, June 25. 1685
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The printer William Disnie is found guilty of treason for publishing pro-Monmouth papers.

The printer William Disnie is found guilty of treason for publishing pro-Monmouth papers.

The printer William Disnie is found guilty of treason for publishing pro-Monmouth papers.

Bristol, June 25. 1685
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The Earl of Feversham learns of Monmouth strength and plans from a spy

The Earl of Feversham learns of Monmouth strength and plans from a spy

The Earl of Feversham learns of Monmouth strength and plans from a spy

Edinburgh, June 26. 1685
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The Rebel Rumbold is hung and quartered for high Treason on this day

The Rebel Rumbold is hung and quartered for high Treason on this day

The Rebel Rumbold is hung and quartered for high Treason on this day

Whitehall, June 27. 1685
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His majesty has been pleased to the reward be distributed amongst the five soldiers of the Earl of Aran’s Militia, who took Rumbold in Scotland.

His majesty has been pleased to the reward be distributed amongst the five soldiers of the Earl of Aran’s Militia, who took Rumbold in Scotland.

His majesty has been pleased to the reward be distributed amongst the five soldiers of the Earl of Aran’s Militia, who took Rumbold in Scotland.

Whitehall, June 28. 1685
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The news in London is that there has been a fight at Keynsham and Rebels gathering at Frome are dispersed.

The news in London is that there has been a fight at Keynsham and Rebels gathering at Frome are dispersed.

The news in London is that there has been a fight at Keynsham and Rebels gathering at Frome are dispersed.

Whitehall, June 29. 1685
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The News in London is about the Battle of Philips Norton between the King forces and those of the Rebels.

The News in London is about the Battle of Philips Norton between the King forces and those of the Rebels.

The News in London is about the Battle of Philips Norton between the King forces and those of the Rebels.

Whitehall, June 30. 1685
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Three Scotch Regiments arrive this morning at Gravesend, whilst three English Regiments also in the Service of the United Provinces are due to arrive soon.

Three Scotch Regiments arrive this morning at Gravesend, whilst three English Regiments also in the Service of the United Provinces are due to arrive soon.

Three Scotch Regiments arrive this morning at Gravesend, whilst three English Regiments also in the Service of the United Provinces are due to arrive soon.

Westminster, July 1. 1685
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It is now High Treason to assert that the Duke of Monmouth that in anyway legitimate

It is now High Treason to assert that the Duke of Monmouth that in anyway legitimate

It is now High Treason to assert that the Duke of Monmouth that in anyway legitimate

Edinburgh, July 1. 1685
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The News in London is that the Earl of Argyll was executed yesterday and that Sir John Cochran is now captured.

The News in London is that the Earl of Argyll was executed yesterday and that Sir John Cochran is now captured.

The News in London is that the Earl of Argyll was executed yesterday and that Sir John Cochran is now captured.

Whitehall, July 1. 1685
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The News is that the Rebels retired to Shepton Mallet, whilst the Kings forces are now at Frome

The News is that the Rebels retired to Shepton Mallet, whilst the Kings forces are now at Frome

The News is that the Rebels retired to Shepton Mallet, whilst the Kings forces are now at Frome

Paris, July 2. 1685
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Louis XIV remarks that as the Duke of Monmouth has lost his vessels and has no city to retire to, he will soon meet with the same fate as the Earl of Argyll

Louis XIV remarks that as the Duke of Monmouth has lost his vessels and has no city to retire to, he will soon meet with the same fate as the Earl of Argyll

Louis XIV remarks that as the Duke of Monmouth has lost his vessels and has no city to retire to, he will soon meet with the same fate as the Earl of Argyll

Whitehall, July 4. 1685
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The Rebels sack and pillage Wells and are now in Bridgwater and 3 Scotch Regiments have marched from London.

The Rebels sack and pillage Wells and are now in Bridgwater and 3 Scotch Regiments have marched from London.

The Rebels sack and pillage Wells and are now in Bridgwater and 3 Scotch Regiments have marched from London.

Whitehall, July 8. 1685
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The News is that there has been a mighty Battle in a place called Sedgemoor and his Majesties forces are victorious.

The News is that there has been a mighty Battle in a place called Sedgemoor and his Majesties forces are victorious.

The News is that there has been a mighty Battle in a place called Sedgemoor and his Majesties forces are victorious.

Ringwod, July 8. 1685
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This very morning the King received an account that the Lord Grey was taken yesterday in at Ringwood being secured by my Lord Lumley.

This very morning the King received an account that the Lord Grey was taken yesterday in at Ringwood being secured by my Lord Lumley.

This very morning the King received an account that the Lord Grey was taken yesterday in at Ringwood being secured by my Lord Lumley.

London, July 8. 1685
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His Majesty has just now received an account that the Duke of Monmouth was taken in Dorestshire, and is in the hands of my Lord Lumley.

His Majesty has just now received an account that the Duke of Monmouth was taken in Dorestshire, and is in the hands of my Lord Lumley.

His Majesty has just now received an account that the Duke of Monmouth was taken in Dorestshire, and is in the hands of my Lord Lumley.

Whitehall, July 11. 1685
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As the Rebels are completely broken, dispersed or taken, the Kings forces go into quarters and Militia dismissed. The Duke of Monmouth and Lord Grey will be this night at Farnham

As the Rebels are completely broken, dispersed or taken, the Kings forces go into quarters and Militia dismissed. The Duke of Monmouth and Lord Grey will be this night at Farnham

As the Rebels are completely broken, dispersed or taken, the Kings forces go into quarters and Militia dismissed. The Duke of Monmouth and Lord Grey will be this night at Farnham

Whitehall, July 12. 1685
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The King proclaims that all subjects MUST attend services of solemn thanksgiving on the 26 July 1685 to celebrate His Victory over the Rebels.

The King proclaims that all subjects MUST attend services of solemn thanksgiving on the 26 July 1685 to celebrate His Victory over the Rebels.

The King proclaims that all subjects MUST attend services of solemn thanksgiving on the 26 July 1685 to celebrate His Victory over the Rebels.

Whitehall, July 13. 1685
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This evening the Duke of Monmouth and Lord Grey were carried to the Tower in Kings Barges, guarded by several other Barges with Soldiers.

This evening the Duke of Monmouth and Lord Grey were carried to the Tower in Kings Barges, guarded by several other Barges with Soldiers.

This evening the Duke of Monmouth and Lord Grey were carried to the Tower in Kings Barges, guarded by several other Barges with Soldiers.

Whitehall, July 15. 1685
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This day the late Duke of Monmouth being attainted of High Treason by Act of Parliament, was Beheaded on a Scaffold for that purpose erected on Tower Hill.

This day the late Duke of Monmouth being attainted of High Treason by Act of Parliament, was Beheaded on a Scaffold for that purpose erected on Tower Hill.

This day the late Duke of Monmouth being attainted of High Treason by Act of Parliament, was Beheaded on a Scaffold for that purpose erected on Tower Hill.

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Whitehall, July 12. 1685

His Majesty has been pleased to cause His Royal Proclamation to be Published for a Solemn and Public Thanksgiving throughout the Kingdom for His Majesties late Victories over the Rebels.

Whereas it hath pleased Almighty God in the beginning of Our Reign to manifest His great Goodness towards Us and Our Kingdom, in giving Us so absolute and single Victories over the Late Rebels, who in contempt of the Laws of God and these Kingdoms rose up against Us in open Rebellion, threatening the subversion of the Peace and Tranquillity of Our Kingdoms; whereby it hath pleased Him in His infinite Marcy not only to restore to us and our Kingdoms a perfect Peace, by an utter Dissipation of all those Rebels, but likewise to deliver into Our hands the chief heads of that Horrid Traitorous Conspiracy in order to their condign punishment, that thereby nothing might remain to interrupt Our peaceable Government for the future. Upon the due consideration whereof, we do with all Humility Admire and Adore the late Mercy and Goodness of God in giving Victory to our Arms and delivering Us and Our Kingdoms from the Miseries and Calamities that might, and constantly do ensue an Intestine and Unnatural Rebellion. And considering that such signal and public mercies are invitations from Heaven to us and all our subjects to render the most public and cheerful Expressions of thankfulness to the Divine Goodness. We are willing that the first tribute of praise and thanksgiving to our  great sovereign the KING of Heaven and Earth, be solemnly returned by Us and all our people for this His late Mercy. And to the end some solemn time may be appointed for the public  performance of this Duty, that all Our Subjects in England and Wales, and Town of Berwick upon Tweet, who equally share in the blessing and joys of this Deliverance, may be united in the Devotions which are offered for it; We do hereby publish and declare that Sunday the Twenty Sixth Day of this instant July be observed as a Day of Public Thanksgiving to Almighty God throughout Our Kingdom of England, dominion of Wales, and Town of Berwick upon Tweed, for this His great Mercy. And we do direct and appoint that this our proclamation be publicly read in all Churches and Chapels on Sunday precedent thereto, to the end that notice be taken thereof, and due Thanks and Praise may upon the said Twenty Sixth Day of July be offered up unto Almighty God by Us and all Our People with one Heart; And that humble supplications be made before Him for His continual assistance and improvement of this and all His Mercies, to the Honour of His great Name, and the Safety, Peace and benefit of all our Kingdoms and Dominions: We willing and strictly commanding all person within these Our Dominions with all sobriety, Reverence and Thankfulness to perform this Duty on that day, and to observe the same as becomes so solemn an occasion.

Given at Our Court at Whitehall the 11th day of July 1685. In the first year of our Reign.

Edinburgh, June 1. 1685
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News of the Earl of Argyle and his march from movements from Campbeltown with now over 2500 supporters.

News of the Earl of Argyle and his march from movements from Campbeltown with now over 2500 supporters.

News of the Earl of Argyle and his march from movements from Campbeltown with now over 2500 supporters.

Edinburgh, June 6. 1685
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An account of the skirmishes at Glendarroch and Greenock between the forces of King and the rebels.

An account of the skirmishes at Glendarroch and Greenock between the forces of King and the rebels.

An account of the skirmishes at Glendarroch and Greenock between the forces of King and the rebels.

Edinburgh, June 9. 1685
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Earl of Argyll withdraws to Loch Fyne, whilst Scotch troops leave Holland.

Earl of Argyll withdraws to Loch Fyne, whilst Scotch troops leave Holland.

Earl of Argyll withdraws to Loch Fyne, whilst Scotch troops leave Holland.

Edinburgh, June 11. 1685
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News of Argyll's move to engage with the Kings force reaches London

News of Argyll's move to engage with the Kings force reaches London

News of Argyll's move to engage with the Kings force reaches London

Whitehall, June 13. 1685
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The King gets the news, that Monmouth has landed at Lyme.

The King gets the news, that Monmouth has landed at Lyme.

The King gets the news, that Monmouth has landed at Lyme.

Westminster, June 16. 1685
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Today the Act of Attainder against James, Duke of Monmouth for High Treason gets royal assent.

Today the Act of Attainder against James, Duke of Monmouth for High Treason gets royal assent.

Today the Act of Attainder against James, Duke of Monmouth for High Treason gets royal assent.

Whitehall, June 17. 1685
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News reaches London of the Bridport fight, at which the Rebels are defeated.

News reaches London of the Bridport fight, at which the Rebels are defeated.

News reaches London of the Bridport fight, at which the Rebels are defeated.

Edinburgh, June 18. 1685
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New reaches London of the capture of the Rebel ships, yet the Scotch Rebels still move towards Glasgow

New reaches London of the capture of the Rebel ships, yet the Scotch Rebels still move towards Glasgow

New reaches London of the capture of the Rebel ships, yet the Scotch Rebels still move towards Glasgow

Edinburgh, June 19. 1685
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The Kings forces have forced the Rebels to cross the Clyde in some disorder and we expect word of Argyll's capture daily.

The Kings forces have forced the Rebels to cross the Clyde in some disorder and we expect word of Argyll's capture daily.

The Kings forces have forced the Rebels to cross the Clyde in some disorder and we expect word of Argyll's capture daily.

Edinburgh, June 21. 1685
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News of the capture of the Rebel Earl of Argyll reaches London

News of the capture of the Rebel Earl of Argyll reaches London

News of the capture of the Rebel Earl of Argyll reaches London

Whitehall, June 21. 1865
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News of the fight at Ashill reaches London together with the Rebel progress

News of the fight at Ashill reaches London together with the Rebel progress

News of the fight at Ashill reaches London together with the Rebel progress

London, June 22. 1685
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The gossip in the London is that the Somerset Militia have killed Earl of Albemarle and joined with the Rebels.

The gossip in the London is that the Somerset Militia have killed Earl of Albemarle and joined with the Rebels.

The gossip in the London is that the Somerset Militia have killed Earl of Albemarle and joined with the Rebels.

Whitehall, June 23. 1685
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The Rebels ship are taken at Lyme and there is an encounter at Longport

The Rebels ship are taken at Lyme and there is an encounter at Longport

The Rebels ship are taken at Lyme and there is an encounter at Longport

Edinburgh, June 24. 1685
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The Scotch Rebels continue to be made prisoner but many others where killed the day Rumbold and Ayloff where taken.

The Scotch Rebels continue to be made prisoner but many others where killed the day Rumbold and Ayloff where taken.

The Scotch Rebels continue to be made prisoner but many others where killed the day Rumbold and Ayloff where taken.

Southwark, June 25. 1685
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The printer William Disnie is found guilty of treason for publishing pro-Monmouth papers.

The printer William Disnie is found guilty of treason for publishing pro-Monmouth papers.

The printer William Disnie is found guilty of treason for publishing pro-Monmouth papers.

Bristol, June 25. 1685
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The Earl of Feversham learns of Monmouth strength and plans from a spy

The Earl of Feversham learns of Monmouth strength and plans from a spy

The Earl of Feversham learns of Monmouth strength and plans from a spy

Edinburgh, June 26. 1685
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The Rebel Rumbold is hung and quartered for high Treason on this day

The Rebel Rumbold is hung and quartered for high Treason on this day

The Rebel Rumbold is hung and quartered for high Treason on this day

Whitehall, June 27. 1685
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His majesty has been pleased to the reward be distributed amongst the five soldiers of the Earl of Aran’s Militia, who took Rumbold in Scotland.

His majesty has been pleased to the reward be distributed amongst the five soldiers of the Earl of Aran’s Militia, who took Rumbold in Scotland.

His majesty has been pleased to the reward be distributed amongst the five soldiers of the Earl of Aran’s Militia, who took Rumbold in Scotland.

Whitehall, June 28. 1685
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The news in London is that there has been a fight at Keynsham and Rebels gathering at Frome are dispersed.

The news in London is that there has been a fight at Keynsham and Rebels gathering at Frome are dispersed.

The news in London is that there has been a fight at Keynsham and Rebels gathering at Frome are dispersed.

Whitehall, June 29. 1685
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The News in London is about the Battle of Philips Norton between the King forces and those of the Rebels.

The News in London is about the Battle of Philips Norton between the King forces and those of the Rebels.

The News in London is about the Battle of Philips Norton between the King forces and those of the Rebels.

Whitehall, June 30. 1685
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Three Scotch Regiments arrive this morning at Gravesend, whilst three English Regiments also in the Service of the United Provinces are due to arrive soon.

Three Scotch Regiments arrive this morning at Gravesend, whilst three English Regiments also in the Service of the United Provinces are due to arrive soon.

Three Scotch Regiments arrive this morning at Gravesend, whilst three English Regiments also in the Service of the United Provinces are due to arrive soon.

Westminster, July 1. 1685
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It is now High Treason to assert that the Duke of Monmouth that in anyway legitimate

It is now High Treason to assert that the Duke of Monmouth that in anyway legitimate

It is now High Treason to assert that the Duke of Monmouth that in anyway legitimate

Edinburgh, July 1. 1685
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The News in London is that the Earl of Argyll was executed yesterday and that Sir John Cochran is now captured.

The News in London is that the Earl of Argyll was executed yesterday and that Sir John Cochran is now captured.

The News in London is that the Earl of Argyll was executed yesterday and that Sir John Cochran is now captured.

Whitehall, July 1. 1685
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The News is that the Rebels retired to Shepton Mallet, whilst the Kings forces are now at Frome

The News is that the Rebels retired to Shepton Mallet, whilst the Kings forces are now at Frome

The News is that the Rebels retired to Shepton Mallet, whilst the Kings forces are now at Frome

Paris, July 2. 1685
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Louis XIV remarks that as the Duke of Monmouth has lost his vessels and has no city to retire to, he will soon meet with the same fate as the Earl of Argyll

Louis XIV remarks that as the Duke of Monmouth has lost his vessels and has no city to retire to, he will soon meet with the same fate as the Earl of Argyll

Louis XIV remarks that as the Duke of Monmouth has lost his vessels and has no city to retire to, he will soon meet with the same fate as the Earl of Argyll

Whitehall, July 4. 1685
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The Rebels sack and pillage Wells and are now in Bridgwater and 3 Scotch Regiments have marched from London.

The Rebels sack and pillage Wells and are now in Bridgwater and 3 Scotch Regiments have marched from London.

The Rebels sack and pillage Wells and are now in Bridgwater and 3 Scotch Regiments have marched from London.

Whitehall, July 8. 1685
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The News is that there has been a mighty Battle in a place called Sedgemoor and his Majesties forces are victorious.

The News is that there has been a mighty Battle in a place called Sedgemoor and his Majesties forces are victorious.

The News is that there has been a mighty Battle in a place called Sedgemoor and his Majesties forces are victorious.

Ringwod, July 8. 1685
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This very morning the King received an account that the Lord Grey was taken yesterday in at Ringwood being secured by my Lord Lumley.

This very morning the King received an account that the Lord Grey was taken yesterday in at Ringwood being secured by my Lord Lumley.

This very morning the King received an account that the Lord Grey was taken yesterday in at Ringwood being secured by my Lord Lumley.

London, July 8. 1685
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His Majesty has just now received an account that the Duke of Monmouth was taken in Dorestshire, and is in the hands of my Lord Lumley.

His Majesty has just now received an account that the Duke of Monmouth was taken in Dorestshire, and is in the hands of my Lord Lumley.

His Majesty has just now received an account that the Duke of Monmouth was taken in Dorestshire, and is in the hands of my Lord Lumley.

Whitehall, July 11. 1685
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As the Rebels are completely broken, dispersed or taken, the Kings forces go into quarters and Militia dismissed. The Duke of Monmouth and Lord Grey will be this night at Farnham

As the Rebels are completely broken, dispersed or taken, the Kings forces go into quarters and Militia dismissed. The Duke of Monmouth and Lord Grey will be this night at Farnham

As the Rebels are completely broken, dispersed or taken, the Kings forces go into quarters and Militia dismissed. The Duke of Monmouth and Lord Grey will be this night at Farnham

Whitehall, July 12. 1685
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The King proclaims that all subjects MUST attend services of solemn thanksgiving on the 26 July 1685 to celebrate His Victory over the Rebels.

The King proclaims that all subjects MUST attend services of solemn thanksgiving on the 26 July 1685 to celebrate His Victory over the Rebels.

The King proclaims that all subjects MUST attend services of solemn thanksgiving on the 26 July 1685 to celebrate His Victory over the Rebels.

Whitehall, July 13. 1685
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This evening the Duke of Monmouth and Lord Grey were carried to the Tower in Kings Barges, guarded by several other Barges with Soldiers.

This evening the Duke of Monmouth and Lord Grey were carried to the Tower in Kings Barges, guarded by several other Barges with Soldiers.

This evening the Duke of Monmouth and Lord Grey were carried to the Tower in Kings Barges, guarded by several other Barges with Soldiers.

Whitehall, July 15. 1685
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This day the late Duke of Monmouth being attainted of High Treason by Act of Parliament, was Beheaded on a Scaffold for that purpose erected on Tower Hill.

This day the late Duke of Monmouth being attainted of High Treason by Act of Parliament, was Beheaded on a Scaffold for that purpose erected on Tower Hill.

This day the late Duke of Monmouth being attainted of High Treason by Act of Parliament, was Beheaded on a Scaffold for that purpose erected on Tower Hill.

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Whitehall, July 11. 1685

The Kings Forces that were employed against the Rebels are retiring into their several quarters, the Rebels being completely broken and dispersed, many of them being taken. Orders have been issued to the Lords Lieutenants of the several Counties to dismiss the Militia. The Duke of Monmouth and the Lord Grey being ordered to be brought up hither with the German that was taken with the said Duke, they have come from Ringwood, and will be this night at Farnham.

Edinburgh, June 1. 1685
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News of the Earl of Argyle and his march from movements from Campbeltown with now over 2500 supporters.

News of the Earl of Argyle and his march from movements from Campbeltown with now over 2500 supporters.

News of the Earl of Argyle and his march from movements from Campbeltown with now over 2500 supporters.

Edinburgh, June 6. 1685
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An account of the skirmishes at Glendarroch and Greenock between the forces of King and the rebels.

An account of the skirmishes at Glendarroch and Greenock between the forces of King and the rebels.

An account of the skirmishes at Glendarroch and Greenock between the forces of King and the rebels.

Edinburgh, June 9. 1685
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Earl of Argyll withdraws to Loch Fyne, whilst Scotch troops leave Holland.

Earl of Argyll withdraws to Loch Fyne, whilst Scotch troops leave Holland.

Earl of Argyll withdraws to Loch Fyne, whilst Scotch troops leave Holland.

Edinburgh, June 11. 1685
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News of Argyll's move to engage with the Kings force reaches London

News of Argyll's move to engage with the Kings force reaches London

News of Argyll's move to engage with the Kings force reaches London

Whitehall, June 13. 1685
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The King gets the news, that Monmouth has landed at Lyme.

The King gets the news, that Monmouth has landed at Lyme.

The King gets the news, that Monmouth has landed at Lyme.

Westminster, June 16. 1685
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Today the Act of Attainder against James, Duke of Monmouth for High Treason gets royal assent.

Today the Act of Attainder against James, Duke of Monmouth for High Treason gets royal assent.

Today the Act of Attainder against James, Duke of Monmouth for High Treason gets royal assent.

Whitehall, June 17. 1685
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News reaches London of the Bridport fight, at which the Rebels are defeated.

News reaches London of the Bridport fight, at which the Rebels are defeated.

News reaches London of the Bridport fight, at which the Rebels are defeated.

Edinburgh, June 18. 1685
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New reaches London of the capture of the Rebel ships, yet the Scotch Rebels still move towards Glasgow

New reaches London of the capture of the Rebel ships, yet the Scotch Rebels still move towards Glasgow

New reaches London of the capture of the Rebel ships, yet the Scotch Rebels still move towards Glasgow

Edinburgh, June 19. 1685
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The Kings forces have forced the Rebels to cross the Clyde in some disorder and we expect word of Argyll's capture daily.

The Kings forces have forced the Rebels to cross the Clyde in some disorder and we expect word of Argyll's capture daily.

The Kings forces have forced the Rebels to cross the Clyde in some disorder and we expect word of Argyll's capture daily.

Edinburgh, June 21. 1685
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News of the capture of the Rebel Earl of Argyll reaches London

News of the capture of the Rebel Earl of Argyll reaches London

News of the capture of the Rebel Earl of Argyll reaches London

Whitehall, June 21. 1865
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News of the fight at Ashill reaches London together with the Rebel progress

News of the fight at Ashill reaches London together with the Rebel progress

News of the fight at Ashill reaches London together with the Rebel progress

London, June 22. 1685
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The gossip in the London is that the Somerset Militia have killed Earl of Albemarle and joined with the Rebels.

The gossip in the London is that the Somerset Militia have killed Earl of Albemarle and joined with the Rebels.

The gossip in the London is that the Somerset Militia have killed Earl of Albemarle and joined with the Rebels.

Whitehall, June 23. 1685
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The Rebels ship are taken at Lyme and there is an encounter at Longport

The Rebels ship are taken at Lyme and there is an encounter at Longport

The Rebels ship are taken at Lyme and there is an encounter at Longport

Edinburgh, June 24. 1685
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The Scotch Rebels continue to be made prisoner but many others where killed the day Rumbold and Ayloff where taken.

The Scotch Rebels continue to be made prisoner but many others where killed the day Rumbold and Ayloff where taken.

The Scotch Rebels continue to be made prisoner but many others where killed the day Rumbold and Ayloff where taken.

Southwark, June 25. 1685
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The printer William Disnie is found guilty of treason for publishing pro-Monmouth papers.

The printer William Disnie is found guilty of treason for publishing pro-Monmouth papers.

The printer William Disnie is found guilty of treason for publishing pro-Monmouth papers.

Bristol, June 25. 1685
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The Earl of Feversham learns of Monmouth strength and plans from a spy

The Earl of Feversham learns of Monmouth strength and plans from a spy

The Earl of Feversham learns of Monmouth strength and plans from a spy

Edinburgh, June 26. 1685
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The Rebel Rumbold is hung and quartered for high Treason on this day

The Rebel Rumbold is hung and quartered for high Treason on this day

The Rebel Rumbold is hung and quartered for high Treason on this day

Whitehall, June 27. 1685
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His majesty has been pleased to the reward be distributed amongst the five soldiers of the Earl of Aran’s Militia, who took Rumbold in Scotland.

His majesty has been pleased to the reward be distributed amongst the five soldiers of the Earl of Aran’s Militia, who took Rumbold in Scotland.

His majesty has been pleased to the reward be distributed amongst the five soldiers of the Earl of Aran’s Militia, who took Rumbold in Scotland.

Whitehall, June 28. 1685
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The news in London is that there has been a fight at Keynsham and Rebels gathering at Frome are dispersed.

The news in London is that there has been a fight at Keynsham and Rebels gathering at Frome are dispersed.

The news in London is that there has been a fight at Keynsham and Rebels gathering at Frome are dispersed.

Whitehall, June 29. 1685
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The News in London is about the Battle of Philips Norton between the King forces and those of the Rebels.

The News in London is about the Battle of Philips Norton between the King forces and those of the Rebels.

The News in London is about the Battle of Philips Norton between the King forces and those of the Rebels.

Whitehall, June 30. 1685
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Three Scotch Regiments arrive this morning at Gravesend, whilst three English Regiments also in the Service of the United Provinces are due to arrive soon.

Three Scotch Regiments arrive this morning at Gravesend, whilst three English Regiments also in the Service of the United Provinces are due to arrive soon.

Three Scotch Regiments arrive this morning at Gravesend, whilst three English Regiments also in the Service of the United Provinces are due to arrive soon.

Westminster, July 1. 1685
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It is now High Treason to assert that the Duke of Monmouth that in anyway legitimate

It is now High Treason to assert that the Duke of Monmouth that in anyway legitimate

It is now High Treason to assert that the Duke of Monmouth that in anyway legitimate

Edinburgh, July 1. 1685
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The News in London is that the Earl of Argyll was executed yesterday and that Sir John Cochran is now captured.

The News in London is that the Earl of Argyll was executed yesterday and that Sir John Cochran is now captured.

The News in London is that the Earl of Argyll was executed yesterday and that Sir John Cochran is now captured.

Whitehall, July 1. 1685
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The News is that the Rebels retired to Shepton Mallet, whilst the Kings forces are now at Frome

The News is that the Rebels retired to Shepton Mallet, whilst the Kings forces are now at Frome

The News is that the Rebels retired to Shepton Mallet, whilst the Kings forces are now at Frome

Paris, July 2. 1685
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Louis XIV remarks that as the Duke of Monmouth has lost his vessels and has no city to retire to, he will soon meet with the same fate as the Earl of Argyll

Louis XIV remarks that as the Duke of Monmouth has lost his vessels and has no city to retire to, he will soon meet with the same fate as the Earl of Argyll

Louis XIV remarks that as the Duke of Monmouth has lost his vessels and has no city to retire to, he will soon meet with the same fate as the Earl of Argyll

Whitehall, July 4. 1685
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The Rebels sack and pillage Wells and are now in Bridgwater and 3 Scotch Regiments have marched from London.

The Rebels sack and pillage Wells and are now in Bridgwater and 3 Scotch Regiments have marched from London.

The Rebels sack and pillage Wells and are now in Bridgwater and 3 Scotch Regiments have marched from London.

Whitehall, July 8. 1685
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The News is that there has been a mighty Battle in a place called Sedgemoor and his Majesties forces are victorious.

The News is that there has been a mighty Battle in a place called Sedgemoor and his Majesties forces are victorious.

The News is that there has been a mighty Battle in a place called Sedgemoor and his Majesties forces are victorious.

Ringwod, July 8. 1685
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This very morning the King received an account that the Lord Grey was taken yesterday in at Ringwood being secured by my Lord Lumley.

This very morning the King received an account that the Lord Grey was taken yesterday in at Ringwood being secured by my Lord Lumley.

This very morning the King received an account that the Lord Grey was taken yesterday in at Ringwood being secured by my Lord Lumley.

London, July 8. 1685
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His Majesty has just now received an account that the Duke of Monmouth was taken in Dorestshire, and is in the hands of my Lord Lumley.

His Majesty has just now received an account that the Duke of Monmouth was taken in Dorestshire, and is in the hands of my Lord Lumley.

His Majesty has just now received an account that the Duke of Monmouth was taken in Dorestshire, and is in the hands of my Lord Lumley.

Whitehall, July 11. 1685
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As the Rebels are completely broken, dispersed or taken, the Kings forces go into quarters and Militia dismissed. The Duke of Monmouth and Lord Grey will be this night at Farnham

As the Rebels are completely broken, dispersed or taken, the Kings forces go into quarters and Militia dismissed. The Duke of Monmouth and Lord Grey will be this night at Farnham

As the Rebels are completely broken, dispersed or taken, the Kings forces go into quarters and Militia dismissed. The Duke of Monmouth and Lord Grey will be this night at Farnham

Whitehall, July 12. 1685
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The King proclaims that all subjects MUST attend services of solemn thanksgiving on the 26 July 1685 to celebrate His Victory over the Rebels.

The King proclaims that all subjects MUST attend services of solemn thanksgiving on the 26 July 1685 to celebrate His Victory over the Rebels.

The King proclaims that all subjects MUST attend services of solemn thanksgiving on the 26 July 1685 to celebrate His Victory over the Rebels.

Whitehall, July 13. 1685
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This evening the Duke of Monmouth and Lord Grey were carried to the Tower in Kings Barges, guarded by several other Barges with Soldiers.

This evening the Duke of Monmouth and Lord Grey were carried to the Tower in Kings Barges, guarded by several other Barges with Soldiers.

This evening the Duke of Monmouth and Lord Grey were carried to the Tower in Kings Barges, guarded by several other Barges with Soldiers.

Whitehall, July 15. 1685
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This day the late Duke of Monmouth being attainted of High Treason by Act of Parliament, was Beheaded on a Scaffold for that purpose erected on Tower Hill.

This day the late Duke of Monmouth being attainted of High Treason by Act of Parliament, was Beheaded on a Scaffold for that purpose erected on Tower Hill.

This day the late Duke of Monmouth being attainted of High Treason by Act of Parliament, was Beheaded on a Scaffold for that purpose erected on Tower Hill.

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London, July 8. 1685

His Majesty has just now received an account that the Duke of Monmouth was taken this morning in Dorestshire, being hid in a ditch, and that he is in the hands of my Lord Lumley.

Edinburgh, June 1. 1685
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News of the Earl of Argyle and his march from movements from Campbeltown with now over 2500 supporters.

News of the Earl of Argyle and his march from movements from Campbeltown with now over 2500 supporters.

News of the Earl of Argyle and his march from movements from Campbeltown with now over 2500 supporters.

Edinburgh, June 6. 1685