Keynsham, June 25. 1685

It was not much after midnight when we came up to the village of Keynsham, I ordered Capt. Brand to wait with his troop whilst I took forward Capt. Tily and two files to scout the approaches. Finding the village itself clear of enemy, we could see that they had a camp to the north across bridge itself. Perceiving that no out-guards were stationed on our side of the bridge, we moved forward to the edge of the village closest to their camp. Here we readied our firelocks and sent word back that Capt. Brand should he come up with the rest of the force. With firelocks ready we now moved forward in an open line, but the enemy becoming aware of our movement, drew up and fired their pistols in our direction. Whereupon, Capt. Tily ordered his men to fire and advance in their pairs. With our first shots the enemy quickly withdrew to their horses and made haste towards Bristol, with no loss on either side.

We now repaired the bridge, which had one arch destroyed by the enemy. We did this with planks and boards taken from the nearby buildings. Once the repair was strong enough, Capt. Brand crossed with his troop to post out-guards whilst Capt. Tily secured both sides of the Bridge with defences. We now sent word to his Majesty and Col. Wade that they should bring up the Army as early as possible to this place. Our out-guards came in with news that the roads to Bath and Bristol where clear of enemy, but that a considerable party of horse had crossed towards Bristol early this morning.

It was not until 10, this morning that Col. Wade and the rest of the Foot Guards arrived at the Bridge and started to cross over into Gloucestershire. We agreed to deploy upon a flat field where the Army could cover the main Bristol Road. This is at a place called ‘Sydenham Meadow’ and was of a good advantage, for it was on a rising ridge and had Bridges to the East and West of our position. Capt. Brand and his troop now withdrew across the bridge to shelter in the village, rest and secure the south road to Bristol. A little after noon, his Majesty and party arrived but we still waited for the Army to finish its deployment. During this time, one Mr Creswicke approached me, saying that he had news for his Majesty, on asking what this was, he showed me a copy of the London Gazette dated 22nd June wherein there was a report of the capture of the Earl of Argyll’s fleet and that his Scotch endeavour was in jeopardy. This news, I handed to his Majesty, for which he thanked Mr Creswicke but said nothing more of this news to his party.

It was taking a considerable time for the Army to cross the Bridge, as the rain had swollen the river and the planking needed almost constant repair. It being impossible to take over the baggage, this was left in the village with a guard of 2 companies and a stand of pike from the Foot Guard under my friend Capt. Goodenough. It was not much after 5 o’clock that the whole Army, excluding our rear-guard and baggage had formed up. This was the first time the whole Army was arrayed and it must now number 7 or 8000 foot and close to 1000 horse.

Whilst, the last of companies of Yellows still crossed the Bridge, there was much shooting and noise from the village itself. Whereon, I was dispatched to discover the reason for this commotion. As I arrived at the Bridge, Major Fox was wounded and the Yellow’s in some disorder. Capt. Perrett reported that whilst they were crossing, a troop of Horse, which they took to be ours, attacked them, killing a number before they could form ranks. Next he said that Capt. Brand’s troop came up and charged the enemy horse, chasing them off. Capt. Perrett pointed me towards the Foot Guards and baggage where Capt. Brand had reformed. I could not see the Capt. but a Lieutenant, who’s name I do not know, gave a report that they had been attacked by a party of Horse coming from Bristol but after a hard fight in which Captain Brand was killed, they had beaten off the enemy killing some 14 men.

Within moments of this news, there was another warning shot from our out-guards, this time from the Bath side of the village. Capt. Goodenough, quickly calling his men to arms, formed his stand of pike across the road and positioned muskets in the buildings and baggage wagons. As the sound of the approaching enemy grew, we ‘charged for horse’ and the muskets readied themselves. As our out-guards came into sight, they are being hotly pursued by the enemy Horse. With some courage, the enemy attempted to break into our pike, but our men stood firm and our shot now started doing some damage to them, so they broke off the attack with some loss and withdrew. We had some dozen or so men killed or wounded in the fight, yet the enemy had left one man captured and three or four others killed, whilst a great number must have returned wounded. I now had the opportunity to talk to all three of the captured enemy troopers, one was a Horse Grenadier from Bristol serving in Capt. Parkers Troop, the others from the Life Guards under Major Orglethorpe who had come from up from Bath.

His Majesty now arrived and called the other officers of note into a Council of War. We all retired to a Manor House in the village of Keynsham. In the room alongside his Majesty are Col. Wade, Col. Venner, Lord Grey, Dr Ferguson, Col. Ffoulkes and Col. Matthews.  Alongside these gentlemen, was John Rowe an agent from Bristol and a man I didn’t know. His Majesty started by giving us the news of Argyll’s poor state and then he asked John Rowe to give the news from Bristol. This was that the Earl of Feversham with 4000 Militia, the Foot Guards and a strong party of Horse are now in that place. Next, he introduced Capt. Adlam, the gentlemen I did not know, to give his news from Warminster.  The Captain told of a large force, 2 to 3000 gathering in Warminster this day and that the enemy militia had marched off to Bath. Finally, his Majesty turned to me and asked that I give the reports that I have. I confirmed the news from Bristol and that the Lord Churchill was at Bath with Kirke’s Foot and some Horse, together with the news that the Militia had been ordered to muster at Bath.

With these reports arrayed in front of his us, his Majesty said that we had but three paths open to us. The first was to attack Bristol, yet he feared that this was now to strongly manned and could not be taken without heavy Cannon. The next was to strike North for Gloucester, but now that Argyll’s force was near defeat and this would only lead us further from London, give the Duke of York opportunity to gather more men to his colours and trap us like his father was at Worcester. The final path was to turn east and head towards London, via the Warminster road, which us having drawn the enemy North was now open. Furthermore, 3000 well-armed men waited to join us at Warminster. His Majesty finished by indicating this was his preferred path unless anyone could give a just reason for another course. Both Wade and Rowe made strong arguments for attacking Bristol this night, whilst Venner said we should retire West and look for a coast port and flee back to Holland. The rest agreed with his Majesty and thereupon orders for a night march to Warminster where given. The Horse, Capt. Goodenough’s force and the Baggage now formed the van-guard, as we moved towards Bath. Behind us the rest of the Army took some provisions and slowly re-crossed the Keynsham Bridge.

Texel, May 30. 1685
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Today we sailed in the Heldevenberg for England together with the Duke of Monmouth and 81 other gentlemen of honour

Today we sailed in the Heldevenberg for England together with the Duke of Monmouth and 81 other gentlemen of honour

Today we sailed in the Heldevenberg for England together with the Duke of Monmouth and 81 other gentlemen of honour

The Channel, June 9. 1685
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This evening the Duke of Monmouth issues his commissions and gives instruction on the forming of his Army

This evening the Duke of Monmouth issues his commissions and gives instruction on the forming of his Army

This evening the Duke of Monmouth issues his commissions and gives instruction on the forming of his Army

Seatown, June 10. 1685
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This evening a small party is landed at Seatown to send word of Monmouth's landing at Lyme tomorrow.

This evening a small party is landed at Seatown to send word of Monmouth's landing at Lyme tomorrow.

This evening a small party is landed at Seatown to send word of Monmouth's landing at Lyme tomorrow.

Lyme, June 11. 1685
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Monmouth and his supporters land at Lyme to cheering crowds.

Monmouth and his supporters land at Lyme to cheering crowds.

Monmouth and his supporters land at Lyme to cheering crowds.

Lyme, June 12. 1685
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Monmouth's Army now numbers over 1500 men, yet news arrives that Royal Militia is close at hand.

Monmouth's Army now numbers over 1500 men, yet news arrives that Royal Militia is close at hand.

Monmouth's Army now numbers over 1500 men, yet news arrives that Royal Militia is close at hand.

Lyme, June 13. 1685
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Today we drew first blood after a skirmish with the Militia Horse, leaving two of them dead on the field.

Today we drew first blood after a skirmish with the Militia Horse, leaving two of them dead on the field.

Today we drew first blood after a skirmish with the Militia Horse, leaving two of them dead on the field.

Bridport, June 14. 1685
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Today we fought our first battle with the Militia at Bridport. Our Foot accounted themselves very well.

Today we fought our first battle with the Militia at Bridport. Our Foot accounted themselves very well.

Today we fought our first battle with the Militia at Bridport. Our Foot accounted themselves very well.

Axminster, June 15. 1685
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This day we marched to Axminster and put the Militia to flight.

This day we marched to Axminster and put the Militia to flight.

This day we marched to Axminster and put the Militia to flight.

Chard, June 16. 1685
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Today Monmouth's Army reaches Chard, whilst it continues to grow, now over 3000 men have joined his Grace.

Today Monmouth's Army reaches Chard, whilst it continues to grow, now over 3000 men have joined his Grace.

Today Monmouth's Army reaches Chard, whilst it continues to grow, now over 3000 men have joined his Grace.

Ilminster, June 17. 1685
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The Duke of Monmouth and his Army reaches Ilminster

The Duke of Monmouth and his Army reaches Ilminster

The Duke of Monmouth and his Army reaches Ilminster

Taunton, June 18. 1685
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Monmouth and his Army reach Taunton this evening.

Monmouth and his Army reach Taunton this evening.

Monmouth and his Army reach Taunton this evening.

Taunton, June 19. 1685
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Today we entered Taunton and a new Foot Regiment, the Blue, is raised from Taunton-men.

Today we entered Taunton and a new Foot Regiment, the Blue, is raised from Taunton-men.

Today we entered Taunton and a new Foot Regiment, the Blue, is raised from Taunton-men.

Taunton, June 20. 1685
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The Duke of Monmouth is proclaimed King at the market cross.

The Duke of Monmouth is proclaimed King at the market cross.

The Duke of Monmouth is proclaimed King at the market cross.

Bridgwater, June 21. 1685
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We can now field an Army of 5 Horse Squadrons, 5 Foot Battalions & 4 field cannon.

We can now field an Army of 5 Horse Squadrons, 5 Foot Battalions & 4 field cannon.

We can now field an Army of 5 Horse Squadrons, 5 Foot Battalions & 4 field cannon.

Glastonbury, June 22. 1685
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There is a skirmish between our Horse and those of the enemy at Langport whilst the clubmen look to join with us.

There is a skirmish between our Horse and those of the enemy at Langport whilst the clubmen look to join with us.

There is a skirmish between our Horse and those of the enemy at Langport whilst the clubmen look to join with us.

Shepton Mallet, June 23. 1685
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This day we have progressed to Shepton Mallet but the heavy rain is slowing our advance.

This day we have progressed to Shepton Mallet but the heavy rain is slowing our advance.

This day we have progressed to Shepton Mallet but the heavy rain is slowing our advance.

Pensford, June 24. 1685
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This day we reach Pensford but have word the enemy has damaged the Keynsham Bridge

This day we reach Pensford but have word the enemy has damaged the Keynsham Bridge

This day we reach Pensford but have word the enemy has damaged the Keynsham Bridge

Keynsham, June 25. 1685
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This day we crossed the Avon by the repaired Bridge at Keynsham and fought of the enemy Horse

This day we crossed the Avon by the repaired Bridge at Keynsham and fought of the enemy Horse

This day we crossed the Avon by the repaired Bridge at Keynsham and fought of the enemy Horse

Philips Norton, June 26. 1685
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Monmouth and his Army reach Philips Norton after a long march in heavy rain.

Monmouth and his Army reach Philips Norton after a long march in heavy rain.

Monmouth and his Army reach Philips Norton after a long march in heavy rain.

Philips Norton, June 27. 1685
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Today there is a Battle between Monmouth's Army and the enemy at Philips Norton.

Today there is a Battle between Monmouth's Army and the enemy at Philips Norton.

Today there is a Battle between Monmouth's Army and the enemy at Philips Norton.

Frome, June 28. 1685
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This day Monmouth and his arrive exhausted at Frome after a night march in the rain

This day Monmouth and his arrive exhausted at Frome after a night march in the rain

This day Monmouth and his arrive exhausted at Frome after a night march in the rain

Frome, June 29. 1685
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The council of War debate the General Pardon issued by the enemy and elect to fight on.

The council of War debate the General Pardon issued by the enemy and elect to fight on.

The council of War debate the General Pardon issued by the enemy and elect to fight on.

Shepton Mallet, June 30. 1685
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Monmouth and his Army finding the path to London closed retires West to Shepton Mallet.

Monmouth and his Army finding the path to London closed retires West to Shepton Mallet.

Monmouth and his Army finding the path to London closed retires West to Shepton Mallet.

Wells, July 1. 1685
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This day we captured enemy baggage as Wells and rest here for the night.

This day we captured enemy baggage as Wells and rest here for the night.

This day we captured enemy baggage as Wells and rest here for the night.

Sedgemoor, July 2. 1685
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This day as we marched to Pedwell to meet the grand Clubmen Army of Somerset, yet upon our arrival, they only number some 200 men.

This day as we marched to Pedwell to meet the grand Clubmen Army of Somerset, yet upon our arrival, they only number some 200 men.

This day as we marched to Pedwell to meet the grand Clubmen Army of Somerset, yet upon our arrival, they only number some 200 men.

Bridgwater, July 3. 1683
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Monmouth and his Army return to Bridgwater and start to fortify the town

Monmouth and his Army return to Bridgwater and start to fortify the town

Monmouth and his Army return to Bridgwater and start to fortify the town

Bridgwater, July 4. 1685
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The Army remains at Bridgwater and this evening the local men are allowed to return to their homes as the enemy doesn't press us.

The Army remains at Bridgwater and this evening the local men are allowed to return to their homes as the enemy doesn't press us.

The Army remains at Bridgwater and this evening the local men are allowed to return to their homes as the enemy doesn't press us.

Bridgwater, July 5. 1685
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This afternoon we prepare to march overnight to Axbridge meanwhile the enemy has advanced to Westonzoyland

This afternoon we prepare to march overnight to Axbridge meanwhile the enemy has advanced to Westonzoyland

This afternoon we prepare to march overnight to Axbridge meanwhile the enemy has advanced to Westonzoyland

Castlefield, July 5. 1685
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By late afternoon it is clear our enemy camps at Weston but leaves their right flank in the air.

By late afternoon it is clear our enemy camps at Weston but leaves their right flank in the air.

By late afternoon it is clear our enemy camps at Weston but leaves their right flank in the air.

Longmoor, July 6. 1685
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This night we march to Longmoor to surprise the enemy but a troopers pistol goes off at half-cock.

This night we march to Longmoor to surprise the enemy but a troopers pistol goes off at half-cock.

This night we march to Longmoor to surprise the enemy but a troopers pistol goes off at half-cock.

Sedgemoor, July 6. 1685
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The Armies of the two King's fought a great Battle at Sedgemoor, the victor wrote the History. This is an account from one side.

The Armies of the two King's fought a great Battle at Sedgemoor, the victor wrote the History. This is an account from one side.

The Armies of the two King's fought a great Battle at Sedgemoor, the victor wrote the History. This is an account from one side.

Ilfracombe, July 7. 1685
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With the Rebellion lost, it is every man for himself, Wade, Goodenough, Ferguson and a party make their Escape from Ilfracombe.

With the Rebellion lost, it is every man for himself, Wade, Goodenough, Ferguson and a party make their Escape from Ilfracombe.

With the Rebellion lost, it is every man for himself, Wade, Goodenough, Ferguson and a party make their Escape from Ilfracombe.

Tower Hill, July 15. 1685
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This is an account of the bloody and botched execution of James, Duke of Monmouth on Tower Hill.

This is an account of the bloody and botched execution of James, Duke of Monmouth on Tower Hill.

This is an account of the bloody and botched execution of James, Duke of Monmouth on Tower Hill.

Dorchester, July 18. 1685
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With the Rebellion over the Tyrant paid bloody retribution on those that fought for your Liberty

With the Rebellion over the Tyrant paid bloody retribution on those that fought for your Liberty

With the Rebellion over the Tyrant paid bloody retribution on those that fought for your Liberty

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